March 7, 2013

Samsung Galaxy Camera review: Half-press to play


Introduction

We've been watching phones evolve at a breakneck pace with smartphones all but taking over, while cameras were stuck in the 20th century. Well, no more - the Samsung Galaxy Camera aims to stir the point-and-shoot market the way the iPhone did the phone market.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 official images
Unsurprisingly, Android is just the OS chosen for the task. You see, the Galaxy Camera is a Galaxy S III that was grafted onto a point-and-shoot camera, which gives it abilities unmatched by any device in either individual category.
No smartphone has the 21x optically stabilized zoom lens and the powerful xenon flash of the Galaxy Camera and no camera has access to the Google Play Store with all its hundreds of thousands of apps. You know what they say, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.
You can think of the various apps as building blocks, which make the Samsung Galaxy Camera one of the most versatile digicams in existence. If you need a certain functionality, just grab an app - or several of them - and you've turned the Camera into just the tool for the job, any job.
Before we go on, let's talk pros and cons. Yes, even something like a Galaxy S III with optical zoom has cons.

Key features

  • Point and shoot camera with 21x optical zoom and optical image stabilization
  • Wide-angle 23mm lens, 1/2.3" sensor, 16.3MP resolution
  • Xenon flash
  • 1080p HD video recording at 30fps; 720p High Framerate video recording at 60fps; 768x512 120fps slow-mo
  • 4.8" 16M-color Super Clear LCD capacitive touchscreen of HD (720 x 1280 pixel) resolution; Corning Gorilla Glass 2
  • Android OS v4.1.2 with TouchWiz launcher
  • 1.4 GHz quad-core Cortex-A9 CPU, Mali-400MP GPU, Exynos 4 Quad chipset, 1GB of RAM
  • 100Mbps LTE (market dependent)
  • Quad-band 3G with 21 Mbps HSDPA and 5.76 Mbps HSUPA support
  • Dual-band Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n
  • GPS with A-GPS connectivity; GLONASS support, Digital compass
  • microHDMI TV Out
  • Standard 3.5 mm audio jack
  • Stereo Bluetooth v4.0
  • 8GB internal storage, microSD slot
  • File manager comes preinstalled
  • Extremely rich video and audio codec support
  • Accelerometer and gyroscope sensor

Main disadvantages

  • Image quality leaves a lot to be desired
  • Lens is not dust tight
  • Big for a point-and-shoot
  • Small 1,650mAh battery
  • No video light
Apps are what powered the explosive growth of smartphones and there's a good chance that they'll do the same to "connected" cameras like the Samsung Galaxy Camera (note that Samsung has a line of Wi-Fi connected Smart Cameras that do not run Android).
Of course, early smartphones had their fair share of issues and feature phones often outperformed them in the key area of being a phone. Will this be the case with the Galaxy Camera and regular point and shoots? Well, it's quite possible, but you'll have to read on to find out.
We have to say that the 21x zoom lens is very impressive (even for a camera) and thanks to the Optical Image Stabilization, you can get a steady shot of distant objects and smooth videos. The 720p@60fps high framerate videos are quite exciting too and just in time for the boom of this technology - The Hobbit was shot at 48fps and 60fps is rumored for the next Avatar.
We usually do phone and tablet reviews and the Samsung Galaxy Camera is, well, a camera. Still, its review will read very much like the Samsung Galaxy S III review, mostly because the two are almost identical in terms of software.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera in our office
Except the Galaxy Camera has a really cool custom camera interface - the manual controls will give you the DSLR experience (if not image quality). The hardware would be indistinguishable from that of a regular camera, if it wasn't for the 4.8" big 720p display (that's unmatched in the camera world).
Now that we've whet your appetite, you can jump over to the next page to see what else is unique about the Galaxy Camera.

Design and build quality

The Samsung Galaxy Camera would be hard to tell apart from the rest in Samsung's digicam lineup - the only big tell (besides the Galaxy logo) is that there isn't a single button on its back, just a huge (by camera standards) 4.8" screen with 720p resolution.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera
The Galaxy Camera isn't a small device, but it's been packed with features and still has great ergonomics. The grip on the right allows users to get a stable hold even when shooting with one hand. And a 21x zoom lens gives you what those thin phone camera modules can never offer - proper optical zoom.
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The comfy grip
That lens, however, accounts for the thickest part of the Galaxy Camera, it's easily the size of a pancake lens for a micro four thirds camera. Speaking of which, Samsung's Android-powered digicam is about the same size as an Olympus PEN PL-1.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera vs. Olympus PEN PL-1 size comparison
The Nokia 808 PureView, which is quite chubby by modern smartphone standards, looks small in comparison.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera vs. Nokia 808 PureView size comparison
Yet, with the lens extended to its fullest, it's easy to see that the whole thing couldn't have been much thinner. The lens itself has focal length that ranges from 4.1mm (23mm in 35mm equivalent) to 86.1mm (483mm in 35mm equiv.) and the aperture goes from f/2.8 to f/5.9.
The Galaxy Camera boasts proper Optical Image Stabilization with a dedicated gyroscope. It's much better than the digital trickery used by smartphones as we'll see later on in the review.
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The Galaxy Camera packs an optically-stabilized 21x zoom lens
Behind the lens is a 1/2.3" backlit sensor with 16.3MP of effective resolution.
Right next to the lens is a red AF assist, but there's no video light.
For stills however, the Samsung Galaxy Camera has a proper xenon flash. It pops up upon a press of the flash button on the left side of the camera. It's a small, flush button that will often need you to dig a fingernail in to properly press.
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The pop-up xenon flash • the flash button
When done, the flash can be pushed back in. Getting it to lock into place doesn't always work at the first try. The whole flash experience can be a bit frustrating at times, in terms of turning it on and popping it back in.
The top of the Galaxy Camera is where the only hardware controls are - the Power/Lock key and the traditional zoom lever/shutter key combo. Note that in Android apps the zoom lever maps to the volume rocker, it only controls zoom when the camera is on.
Right next to the zoom lever is the mic pinhole.
The right side of the Camera has a lanyard eyelet, a microUSB port hidden under a plastic flap and a 3.5mm audio jack. On the left, there's the flash button and the loudspeaker grill.
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Hardware controls and mic pinhole on top • 3.5mm audio jack, microUSB port and lanyard eyelet
The bottom of the device has a standard tripod mount and a big hinged lid covering the battery compartment. Within that lid is a smaller flap for the microHDMI port. The battery compartment lid has a lock that keeps it in place. We sometimes found it necessary to lift the HDMI flap and use it to pull open the lid, which doesn't always swing open when you release the lock.
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The tripod mound • microHDMI port, microSIM and microSD card slots • 1,650mAh battery
The 1,650mAh battery is underneath, which has a lock of its own to hold it into place. Right next to the battery are the microSD and microSIM card slots. The Galaxy Camera comes with 4GB of built-in storage, but that can be expanded easily and cheaply.
Finally, we come around to the back of the Samsung Galaxy Camera, which is a mind-blowing 4.8 inches of Super Clear LCD. The bezel is exceptionally thin except along the right edge, which gives you some room to rest a thumb without hitting buttons on the screen. Actually, we would have liked this bezel to be bigger as we still touched a few things on the screen by accident.
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The 4.8" 720p screen should have been better
The screen has the same size and resolution as the Galaxy S III's display (and is covered in Gorilla Glass 2 as well), but isn't a Super AMOLED unit. It's a Super Clear LCD instead. It doesn't have the contrast of an AMOLED - far from it - but colors and viewing angles are quite good. Most disappointingly, sunlight legibility is about average, nowhere near as good as the S III's.
Display test50% brightness100% brightness
Black, cd/m2White, cd/m2Contrast ratioBlack, cd/m2White, cd/m2Contrast ratio
Samsung Galaxy Camera0.262248490.57484843
Samsung I9300 Galaxy S III01740330
Nokia 808 PureView---0455
Nokia Lumia 920---0.485131065
Apple iPhone 50.1320014900.486401320
Nexus 40.2231414470.456081341

We put the Galaxy Camera screen under a microscope and saw a PenTile RGBW matrix. It introduces a White subpixel into the RGB mix, and then only in every other pixel where it replaces the Blue pixel. The idea is that this arrangement is more power-efficient than a standard RGB display at the same brightness. We have never been impressed by the image quality of PenTile RGBW screens, at least this one has the high 306ppi pixel density to save it.

Samsung Galaxy Camera's screen under a microscope

Contrast ratio

  • Nokia 808 PureView4.698
  • Apple iPhone 4S2.269
  • HTC One X2.158
  • Nokia N82.144
  • Apple iPhone 42.016
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia ray1.955
  • Samsung Galaxy Camera1.938
  • Sony Xperia U1.758
  • LG Optimus 4X HD1.691
  • HTC One V1.685
  • LG Optimus Vu1.680
  • HTC Desire V1.646
  • Samsung Galaxy mini 21.114
While the extra large screen doesn't offer the tactility of hardware buttons, the virtual controls on it quickly reconfigure to move from simple Auto controls to DSLR-like manual controls. It also lets you frame the scene better than most other camera screens (which are usually around 3").
The Samsung Galaxy Camera feels great in the hand when you need to take a shot - that grip might not be compact, but it makes holding the camera so much easier. It's a heavy device - the Galaxy Camera weighs 300g - but we didn't find it to be an issue (again thanks to the comfy grip).
The big hardware shutter key is great too, better than any hardware shutter we've seen on a phone (and there are always the on-screen shutter keys for stills and video).
The lens is the thickest part of the Camera, but since it's flat it's quite stable if you put it on a table. Don't worry about scratches either, the lens is protected by an automatic lens cover. As long as you don't hit the camera shortcut on the screen, which would automatically extend the lens, you'll be okay.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera in the hand
While holding the camera landscape is easy, using it in portrait mode is quite uncomfortable. The software has been tweaked for landscape use, sometimes you want to use it in portrait (perhaps a habit of using your phone) and that big, protruding lens barrel makes it quite uncomfortable to hold.
As for pocketability, it's not a jeans pocket device. Yes, you could fit it in your pocket, but we'd recommend having the supplied lanyard on.
Finally, we come to the topic of build quality. The Camera feels solidly built for the most part, but we noticed one big issue - dust gets into the lens too easily. After only a couple of days there were noticeable specs of dusts in photos we shot. It's possible that this is just a problem with the unit we tested, but it's something to keep in mind.
The other thing is the flash - we found the flash button a bit too tiny and we sometimes needed to push more than once to pop the flash back in.

User interface

The Samsung Galaxy Camera is a proper point-and-shoot on the outside, but the on the inside is a full-blown Galaxy S III. The camera comes with Android 4.1 Jelly Bean out of the box (the S III launched with 4.0 ICS) and almost the same Nature UX interface, save for a few camera-specific differences.
Since the Galaxy Camera has nearly all of the features of a Galaxy S III, we'll cover all the usual topics, but we'll re-order things a bit. First, we'll look at the interface and camera and then move on to the rest of the features.
The Samsung Galaxy Camera comes with the lockscreen off by default - you can enable several lockscreens, but that will slow things down when you want to take a photo. This device is primarily a digicam after all and needs to be ready to shoot as soon as you hit the power button.
That's not always the case, which is one of our problems with the Camera. The device can start up fairly quickly, but if you haven't used it in a while it goes into a deeper sleep and it can take several seconds to launch. You can adjust how long the Camera waits before going into hibernation (if at all, but you're trading off battery life here).
The other thing is that you don't always go into the camera once the device is ready - if you used the camera last, that's what you get, but if, for example, you used the music player or the browser or the homescreen then you'll need to start the camera manually.
The Galaxy S III motion gesture to unlock the device and jump straight to the camera isn't available. Starting the camera with the hardware shutter key also didn't work, but those are things that Samsung can enable with a software update later.
Now, let's have a look at the general interface. The whole thing is a spitting image of the Samsung Galaxy S III UI, though changes have been made to accommodate the lack of hardware keys and the fact that the device will be used mostly in landscape orientation rather than portrait.
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The homescreen is a slightly tweaked version of the TouchWiz screen
You still get up to seven homescreens to put shortcuts, folders and widgets on. You can add, remove and rearrange homescreens as usual.
The space for the shortcut dock is taken up by the software keys, so instead of a dock you get only two fixed shortcuts - the camera on the left and the app and widget drawer on the right.
Samsung went for its usual arrangement of Android buttons, Menu, Home and Back, instead of the Back, Home, App switcher that most droids with on-screen controls use. But that's not our biggest problem, it's that the on-screen buttons don't stay in the same place. In landscape, they're in a column on the right of the screen in the General UI or in a line in the top left in the camera viewfinder.
The camera and gallery apps are the ones that move the controls, most other keep them on the right. Still, it can be annoying having to look for buttons that are used as often as Back and Home.
Moving on, the notification area looks pretty much the same - you get Wi-Fi, GPS, Sound mode, Screen rotation, Bluetooth, Mobile data, Blocking mode and Power saving, plus AllShare Cast and Sync, which are just off screen (you need to swipe to get to them).
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The notification area has a lot of functions, but little space for actual notifictations
The notification area also features a brightness slider that lets you quickly adjust the screen backlighting. There's no auto mode as the camera lacks an ambient light sensor.
While we like the Samsung notification area, we have to say it works better in portrait - in landscape there's just not enough space left for actual notifications (especially if you don't have a SIM card in - in that case all you see is the No SIM warning), which is a shame on such a big screen.
The app drawer is the standard ICS and TouchWiz combo - apps and widgets are separated into their own tabs and you can do a pinch gesture to rearrange the panes in the drawer.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
The app drawer houses both app shortcuts and widgets
Once you get several apps running, you can use the task switcher to go back and forth between them. It's an ICS-style list with a screenshot and a name for each app. Apps can be terminated by swiping them away.
There are three buttons at the bottom of the screen - Task Manager, Google Now and Remove all.
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The task switcher has two custom buttons courtesy of Samsung

Camera with OIS and 21x zoom

The Samsung Galaxy Camera is the most advanced shooter in the Galaxy line, it's practically a point-and-shoot camera with Android smarts. It can shoot 16MP stills with Optical Image Stabilization (OIS), up to 21x zoom and a powerful xenon flash (unlike virtually all phone flashes, this one is actually useful).
The Camera has a comfy grip and hardware shutter and zoom keys, the rest is on the large 4.8" screen - the biggest and highest-res viewfinder to ever be found on a digicam. The default mode is very simple - some indicators along the top of the screen (which can be expanded to access the basic settings), a still camera and video camera virtual triggers surrounding a Mode button on the right side and a gallery shortcut in the bottom left.
The Auto mode is good for most situations, but the Smart mode lets you get creative and helps you handle trickier situations. You can access Smart mode either by long pressing the mode button or tapping it and selecting Smart.
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Auto mode
It's a grid (or carousel) of different modes - you get standard scenes here (Landscape, Macro, Action freeze), but also advanced features like burst shot and Best face (which snaps multiple photos, detects faces in them and makes a composite photo by picking the best face in each shot).
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Smart mode
A Panorama mode is also available, as are some specialized modes that use slower shutter speed to capture a better photo - the standard Night mode, but also Fireworks, Light trace and Waterfall.
The images that serve as icons for each mode are very descriptive, so picking the right mode for the job is no problem at all, even for the not too tech savvy. The carousel view offers a one or two sentence description of the mode, including tips (e.g. "A tripod is recommended").
Finally, there's the expert mode, which gives you DSLR-like manual controls. This mode has an interface representing a DSLR lens barrel with several virtual rings that can be rotated to adjust a given setting.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Expert mode - moving through the mode dial
There are several modes available - S (Shutter priority), A (Aperture priority), P (Program, controls the exposure compensation) and M (Manual). There's also a Manual movie mode, but we'll cover it later on.
Don't worry if you don't feel comfortable using these modes and rings - a tooltip will tell you what each ring does and you can also tap the Info shortcut to read a description of the modes and other terms.
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In-camera info on the various modes and terminology
We quite like this interface - it feels natural and it's easy to use. You can always keep track of what settings are selected at the moment thanks to the line of icons on the viewfinder. Settings you've selected manually are shown in red, while automatic settings are in white.
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In Expert mode the interface shows the currently active settings
The Samsung Galaxy Camera leaves a lot to be desired when it comes to image quality. The biggest problem is the amount of noise that drowns out most of the fine detail. Images also have oversharpening halos combined with chromatic aberration. Color accuracy and dynamic range are okay, but the end result is disappointing for a 16MP digicam.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera samples
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Zoom demo
We took some photos with the Galaxy Camera and Galaxy S III to compare how the flagship smartphone does against the Android.-powered camera. One thing we noticed is that the Galaxy Camera lens is wider. The other was that despite having twice the resolution, the Camera doesn't do as well as the S III.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera • Samsung Galaxy S III
Of course, the Galaxy Camera features 21x optical zoom, which is well out of any cameraphone's reach. The image quality actually improves as you zoom in and, at maximum zoom, you get a picture that no phone can offer, not even the Nokia 808 PureView and its own interpretation of lossless zoom.
The optical image stabilization becomes very important here - it keeps the image steady even at maximum zoom, so you can comfortably frame your shot and get good image quality in the end.
The xenon flash on the Camera is actually useful - it's rated at 2m and our tests show that it greatly improves low light photos of close by subjects (e.g. people at a party).

Photo quality comparison

The Samsung Galaxy Camera is the first Android-powered camera to enter our Photo quality compare tool. Here it is compared against two of the best mobile phone cameras, the Galaxy S III and Nokia 808 PureView.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera in our Photo Compare Tool
We have several digital cameras in the tool's database we use for reference. Here's how the Galaxy Camera does against a 2010 Sony point-and-shoot and an Olympus E-450 DSLR.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera vs. digital cameras

Video recording introduces 60fps mode

The Samsung Galaxy Camera shoots 1080p videos at 30fps, but can also do 720p clips in either 30fps or 60fps. The second option shoots high framerate (HFR) similar to The Hobbit movie (which used 48fps). There's also a 120fps slow-mo mode at a reduced resolution.
The camcorder doesn't get a dedicated UI - instead you just press the record video on-screen button and it starts recording. In Auto mode you don't even get a 16:9 viewfinder, you have to switch to Expert Movie mode to get that.
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The camcorder uses the same UI as the still camera
The Galaxy Camera features 21x zoom that you can use during video recording. A nice option here is the Quiet zoom, which makes sure the zoom sound isn't recorded (it's barely audible even with that option off).
Optical image stabilization is the other big advantage that the Galaxy Camera lens has, we tested it against the digital stabilization of the Nokia 808 PureView and it did impressively.
The 1080p videos are smooth, noise-free and with good details and color. Contrast in videos is low and the continuous autofocus triggers too often (there's no way to disable it). Another problem is that the videos are visibly oversharpened.
The video container used is mp4 and it creates clips with a bitrate of about 17-18Mbps, of which 128Kbps are for the stereo sound, recorded at 48 kHz sampling frequency.
You can download an untouched 1080p@30fps video sample from here (0:09s, 18.8MB).
720p HFR videos are quite impressive - we call 30fps videos "smooth", but 60fps brings a whole new level of smoothness. 720p@60fps videos have a slightly surreal quality and they might not be for everyone (we're just so used to 24-30fps that anything else looks odd). However, if you're going to record fast moving objects or do a lot of panning, the limitations of 30fps will make themselves apparent, while 60fps videos will remain buttery smooth.
Note that the doubled framerate makes up for the halved resolution and the mp4 files still have around 17Mbps bitrate.
Unfortunately, YouTube doesn't support 60fps videos and turns them into 30fps videos instead. This limits how you can share your videos. Here's a short sample (0:07s, 14MB) that gives you a taste of how 60fps videos look.
Yet another mode on the Samsung Galaxy Camera is the 120fps slow-mo (4x) video recording. Videos are shot at 768 x 512 resolution but still look pretty decent.

Video quality comparison

The Video Quality Compare tool is where you can observe how each of our contenders handles changes in lighting, what actual resolution they achieve in FullHD recording and what levels of detail are produced.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera in the Video Compare Tool

Gallery and file browser

The Samsung Galaxy Camera comes with the familiar gallery. It opens up in Albums view, which is what we're used to seeing - it lists all folders with photos on the device, along with online albums from Picasa.
Besides, Album view, photos are sorted by Time, Location, Person (photos with tagged faces), Group and Favorites.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
The new Gallery app • alternative view modes
Getting inside an album displays all the photos in a rectangular grid, which is vertically scrollable. There's a column on the left that shows folders, so that you can easily move between them. This is great if you need to select items from multiple folders.
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Browsing through folders is easy
When viewing a single photo, you'll find share and delete shortcuts above the photo, while below is a line of small thumbnails of all other photos in the album. You can tap those small thumbnails to move to other images or you can just swipe sideways.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Viewing a single photo • Simple editing options
The Gallery also supports highly customizable slideshows with several effects to choose from, customizable music and speed. You can also highlight specific images to be included in the slideshow.
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The slideshow option is highly customizable
The Galaxy Camera will try to detect faces automatically (and you can manually highlight faces where it fails). Buddy photo share will use your contacts' profiles to try and recognize who is who automatically. Social tag makes sure that whenever a face is recognized in the photo, their status message appears and you can easily text that contact.
There's an option to print out a photo straight from the gallery, but that works only with Samsung printers.
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You can print photos straight from the gallery
The My Files app hasn't changed really - it is an efficient and simple to use file manager. It can move, copy, lock and rename files in bulk, even send multiple files to another phone. My files will only browse the memory card and the large internal storage (it can't access the system drive).
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Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
The My Files app

Instagram, image and video editors

Instagram comes pre-installed on the Samsung Galaxy Camera. The version we tested worked only in portrait mode, but that's not a big problem as photos are square and the UI works equally well.
The Instagram app lets you snap a photo, maybe apply a filter (or some other tweaks) and post it on your Instagram account along with several social networks (Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Foursquare or Flickr).
Following other users is also a big part of the Instagram experience, so the app will offer to search for your Facebook and phone contacts to see if they have an Instagram account.
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Instagram on Samsung Galaxy Camera
One slightly annoying thing about Instagram on the Galaxy Camera was that the lens automatically extends and retracts when the viewfinder is active or off. That means that the lens will extend when you start the app, then retract after you've snapped a photo and moved on to editing it, then extend again when you go back for another shot.
You can use the Photo Wizard app to edit photos you've taken with the stock camera. It's similar to the stock Android image editing app, but has much more features.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Photo Wizard has tons of effects and editing options
It can do the basics (resize, rotate, crop), tweak image properties (including auto adjust), do some face-recognition-based effects (e.g. airbrush face), do photo effects, including things like simulated tilt shift, and finally, add borders to the image and do collages of multiple photos with clip art and free hand drawing.
Paper Artist is an app borrowed from the Galaxy Note II. It has a long list of effects that can be applied selectively to an image by "painting" them in the areas you want. The app can also capture photos using these effects, complete with a live preview.
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Paper Artists: drawing on an effect and live effect preview
The Samsung Galaxy Camera comes with a simple to use video editor with decent functionality. It asks you to select a theme for your video (you can choose none if you don't like the predefined intros) and import several videos, photos and music. After that, you can pick transition effects between the videos.
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Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Video editor
S Voice and Google Now
Samsung released S Voice as an answer to Siri before Google came out with its own solution in Google Now. S Voice is the culmination of Samsung's ongoing effort at integrating voice commands into the Android experience, an effort which goes back to the days of Vlingo. You may remember the voice activation (saying "Hi Galaxy" to trigger S Voice).
S Voice can do the usual - search the web, make calls, send texts (which Android natively supports and so does Vlingo), but you can also use it instead of the notification area toggles, start the camera and take a photo, control the music player and stop or snooze alarms all with voice commands.
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S Voice has plenty of options
It's also a tool for quickly looking up facts - it's powered by Wolfram Alpha (which handles some of Siri's answers too). It has an enormous database covering topics ranging from Culture and Media to Physics. S Voice can also be used as a calculator.
Samsung has decided to keep S Voice alongside Google's solution as the two do differ in functionality. Jelly Bean has the unspoken Google Now info cards, but it also brought Google's Knowledge Graph, which can answer factual questions.
Google Voice Actions can handle stuff like sending messages (SMS or email), asking for directions, taking a note or opening a site. Since the latest update, Google Now can also launch apps, check and manage your calendar and look up nearby places of interest and stuff like movie openings in theaters.
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Google Now is also on board
One big advantage of Google's Jelly Bean is that the voice typing functionality doesn't require an internet connection to work. You can enter text by speaking anywhere you can use the on-screen keyboard - be it the Messaging app or a note taking app - without the need for a data connection as long as you have pre-downloaded the needed language packs (and those only take about 20-25MB of your storage per pack).
Making voice typing available offline also made it faster as it's not dependent on your connection. What's even more impressive is that the transition hasn't cost it anything in terms of accuracy.
Synthetic benchmarks
This feels odd - talking about benchmark performance on a camera. But the Samsung Galaxy Camera is the fastest camera we've ever benchmarked. Sure, it's the first one we've benchmarked, but on several occasions it outperforms the Samsung Galaxy S III.
That should come as no surprise - there's a Galaxy S III inside the Camera. The same Exynos 4412 chipset anyway - with a quad-core Cortex-A9 processor at 1.5GHz, 1GB of RAM and Mali-400 GPU.
Our CPU benchmarks show that the Samsung Galaxy Camera is very close to the Galaxy S III in terms of raw CPU power, just slightly behind. Compound benchmarks like AnTuTu and Quadrant, however, rate it higher.
Benchmark Pi
Lower is better
·         Sort by Label
·         Sort by Value
·         HTC One X+280
·         LG Optimus G285
·         Samsung Galaxy Note II305
·         HTC One X (Tegra 3)330
·         LG Optimus 4X HD350
·         Samsung Galaxy S III359
·         Meizu MX 4-core362
·         Samsung Galaxy Camera381
·         Nexus 4431
Linpack
Higher is better
·         Sort by Label
·         Sort by Value
·         Samsung Galaxy Note II214.3
·         Nexus 4213.5
·         Meizu MX 4-core189.1
·         HTC One X+177.7
·         Samsung Galaxy S III175.5
·         Samsung Galaxy Camera165
·         HTC One X160.9
·         LG Optimus 4X HD141.5
Geekbench 2
Higher is better
·         Sort by Label
·         Sort by Value
·         Nexus 42100
·         Samsung Galaxy Note II2000
·         Samsung Galaxy S III1845
·         Samsung Galaxy Camera1727
·         LG Optimus G1723
·         HTC One X (Tegra 3)1634
·         Apple iPhone 51601
AnTuTu
Higher is better
·         Sort by Label
·         Sort by Value
·         Samsung Galaxy Camera15758
·         Nexus 415146
·         Samsung Galaxy Note II13562
·         HTC One X+13519
·         Samsung Galaxy S III12288
·         Meizu MX 4-core11820
·         HTC One X (Tegra 3)11633
·         LG Optimus G11226
Quadrant
Higher is better
·         Sort by Label
·         Sort by Value
·         HTC One X+7632
·         LG Optimus G7439
·         HTC One X5952
·         Samsung Galaxy Note II5916
·         Samsung Galaxy Camera5710
·         Samsung Galaxy S III5450
·         Meizu MX 4-core5170
·         LG Optimus 4X HD4814
·         Nexus 44567
The Galaxy Camera can play games too - while the GLBenchmark 2.1 (720p off-screen) results are pretty good, the GLBenchmark 2.5 (1080p off-screen) score is better than a Tegra 3 chipset can offer. You shouldn't have any problems idling the time away between shoots. If you've got backup for the not too impressive 1,650mAh battery.
GLBenchmark 2.1 Egypt (720p offscreen)
Higher is better
·         Sort by Label
·         Sort by Value
·         LG Optimus G113
·         Samsung Galaxy Note II105
·         Samsung Galaxy S III99
·         Meizu MX 4-core80
·         Nexus 478
·         HTC One X (Tegra 3)64
·         LG Optimus 4X HD61
·         Samsung Galaxy Camera56
GLBenchmark 2.5 Egypt (1080p offscreen)
Higher is better
·         Sort by Label
·         Sort by Value
·         LG Optimus G29
·         Apple iPhone 527
·         Nexus 426
·         Samsung Galaxy Note II17
·         Samsung Galaxy S III15
·         Samsung Galaxy Camera15
·         HTC One X+12
·         HTC One X9
Some web browsing is very much an option too - that 3G or LTE connection is good for more than just beaming a picture of your lunch to Instagram. The Samsung Galaxy Camera actually outran the Google Nexus 4 in the SunSpider JavaScript benchmark and beat the Galaxy S III in the BrowserMark 2 HTML5 test. It even edged out the S III and the Nexus 4 in Vellamo.
SunSpider
Lower is better
·         Sort by Label
·         Sort by Value
·         Samsung Ativ S891
·         Apple iPhone 5915
·         Nokia Lumia 920910
·         Samsung Galaxy Note II972
·         HTC One X+1001
·         Motorola RAZR i XT8901059
·         Samsung Galaxy Camera1134
·         Samsung Galaxy S III1192
·         Meizu MX 4-core1312
·         LG Optimus G1353
·         Nexus 41971
BrowserMark 2
Higher is better
·         Sort by Label
·         Sort by Value
·         LG Optimus G2555
·         Nexus 41794
·         Nokia Lumia 9201774
·         Nokia Lumia 8201760
·         Samsung Omnia W1632
·         Samsung Galaxy Camera1582
·         Samsung Galaxy S III1247
Vellamo
Higher is better
·         Sort by Label
·         Sort by Value
·         Samsung Galaxy Note II2418
·         HTC One X (Tegra 3)2078
·         Samsung Galaxy Camera1697
·         Samsung Galaxy S III1641
·         LG Optimus 4X HD1568
·         LG Optimus G1522
·         Meizu MX 4-core1468
·         Nexus 41310
If you're wondering why you would need that much processing power in a camera, you should consider that the advanced functionality enabled by the Android OS opens a lot of possibilities if the device has the computing power for them. You can edit 1080p videos right on the device, no need for a computer, and that takes power. It's also capable of complex live effects - if the Galaxy Camera becomes popular, we should start seeing apps on the Play Store that squeeze the Exynos chipset for all it's worth.
And then there's the other thing - you can use the Camera as a thick, weird phablet. It's not as snazzy as a Galaxy Note II, but it can play games and browse the web almost as well.

Standard TouchWiz phonebook

While the Samsung Galaxy Camera doesn't have telephony features, it still has the standard TouchWiz Contacts app. It packs a wide range of features and since contacts are synced with Google's servers, you'll quickly get the same contacts on the Camera that you have on your Android phone.
The Contacts app is organized into three tabs - Groups, Favorites and Contacts. As usual, there are various options to filter contacts by phone numbers, groups and multiple sorting. You can swipe a contact to the left to jump straight to the SMS composer (but swiping to the right for calls doesn't work, obviously).
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
The Galaxy Camera phonebook
Tapping on a contact reveals all the details available. If you and the contact are using Gtalk, there will be a second tab available here, showing the latest message from that contact.
Anyway, going back to the contact info, it's perfectly organized into different sections for phone, email, etc. Again, you can text or email a contact with the Samsung Galaxy Camera, but not call them (at least until someone figures out how to enable telephony over 3G).
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Detailed contact view
If the phonebook finds duplicate contact entries, it'll prompt joining them. Furthermore, there're a plethora of options once you hit the Menu button. You can view the call history, as well as join, unjoin and share contacts.
There's plenty of contact information you can assign to each contact and it still remains neatly organized. You have all the types listed (numbers, email addresses, etc) and, just like the previous version of TouchWiz UI 4.0, there's a plus sign on the right - tapping it adds another item of that type. Pressing the minus sign under it deletes the unneeded field.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Editing contact details
Of course, the real flexibility of the phonebook becomes apparent when you sign into your social networks. After syncing, the phonebook will automatically merge contacts (you can do it manually too), so that the contact details are pulled from the social networks too.
We tested the loudspeaker performance of the Samsung Galaxy Camera. It's not the loudest, but it's good enough for reviewing videos you've shot or watching a movie.
Speakerphone testVoice, dBPink noise/ Music, dBRinging phone, dBOveral score
Nokia Lumia 92061.664.865.8Below Average
Samsung Galaxy Camera61.860.766.6Below Average
Apple iPhone 566.866.167.7Below Average
HTC One X+64.665.874.6Average
Samsung I9300 Galaxy S III75.166.575.0Good
Samsung Note II N710070.066.680.5Good
Nokia 808 PureView71.164.678.0Good
Google Nexus 471.066.678.8Good
Motorola RAZR XT91074.766.682.1Very Good
LG Optimus G74.671.382.7Excellent
Samsung Ativ S73.773.582.7Excellent

Sent from my camera: texting and email

The messaging department is quite straightforward: you get a list of recent conversation threads and a compose message button, that's it. There's application-specific search that lets you quickly find a given message among all your stored SMS and MMS.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
The Galaxy Camera messaging center
Message threads are shown with speech bubbles, similar to an IM program. Composing a message is easy - you type in the name of the recipient (only a few letters will do, you'll get autocomplete suggestions) and then type your message (there's a char and message counter on the right). If you attach multimedia to the message, it will be turned into an MMS message.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Reading a message • message options • composing a message • attaching multimedia
Moving on to email, the Gmail app has grown handy shortcuts at the bottom of the screen but is mostly unchanged. It supports batch operations, which allow multiple emails to be archived, labeled or deleted. The default app supports multiple Gmail accounts, but there's no unified inbox. A convenient feature allows you to swipe sideways to move between messages.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
The Gmail should be pretty familiar to everyone by now
There is also a generic email app for all your other email accounts and it can handle multiple POP or IMAP inboxes. This one has much of the same features as the Gmail app like batch operations and swiping between messages (though this isn't as nicely animated). It has a color-coded Combined inbox, which makes it easy to manage multiple email accounts.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
The standard email app also does a good job • the combined inbox
Google Talk handles the Instant Messaging department. The G-Talk network is compatible with a variety of popular clients like Pidgin, Kopete, iChat and Ovi Contacts.
Text entry is handled by the standard Samsung QWERTY keyboard, which offers very big and comfortable keys. If you're going to type in landscape mode, you'll have to surrender most of the screen to the keyboard, which leaves little for the message box.
The Samsung keyboard packs some cool features out of the box. By default a horizontal swipe will switch the case (upper or lower), but you can enable continuous input, which is similar to Swipe and the like. You can use the built-in offline voice recognition to dictate the message too.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
QWERTY keyboard • continuous input • voice input
There are two other modes: one for handwriting recognition and one that shows the recent items in the clipboard.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Handwriting recognition • clipboard

TouchWiz music player

The Samsung Galaxy Camera packs a capable music player with equalizer presets (including a custom one) and SoundAlive technology, which features 7.1 channel virtualization. Samsung uses SoundAlive in some of their MP3 and Android-powered media players.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
SoundAlive presets • Manual preset
Music is sorted into various categories, and there is the Music square feature, similar to SensMe on Sony phones. Music square will automatically rate a song as exciting or calm, passionate or joyful and place the tracks accordingly on a square (hence the name).
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
The music player
From here, you can highlight an area of the square and the phone will automatically build a playlist of songs that matches your selection.
You can swipe the album art left and right to skip tracks songs. You can also place your palm over the screen to pause playback.
The Galaxy Camera player is DLNA-enabled, so you're not limited to locally saved tracks only - songs on devices connected to your Wi-Fi network are as easy to get to as locally stored songs.

Impressive video player

The Samsung Galaxy Camera features the same video player as the S III, which is one of the most capable video players we've seen on a mobile device.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
The video player has a simple interface but is quite capable
It offers several view modes - grid, list, folders and nearby devices (which accesses DLNA devices). The grid view is our favorite as it is a true quad-core tour de force - the visible video thumbnails (all eight of them) are actually playing the videos instead of being static images. They play at a reduced framerate, but it's an awesome preview and it shows what can be done when you have processing power to spare.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Two of the view modes available for browsing your videos
Another cool feature that showcases the power of the Exynos chipset is the chapter preview - it detects chapters in the video and shows a rectangular grid.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Plenty of settings available • the chapter preview
The video player had absolutely no trouble with any of the files we threw at it - starting with .WMV, through .AVI (DivX and XviD) and .MP4 to .MKV (H.264). Resolution wasn't a problem either - the Samsung Galaxy Camera played FullHD files. Large files worked glitch-free.
You can adjust video brightness, color tone, enable outdoor visibility and choose between three crop modes for how the video fits the screen. The same SoundAlive audio-enhancing technology is available here too.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
SoundAlive enhancements are available
The video player allows you to manually select which subtitles you want, a feature dearly missed from most other players on Android devices. You can even adjust the timing of the subtitles if needed.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Picking the right subtitle file, the easy way
The video player on the Camera has a feature called Pop up play - it moves the video in a small floating window and you can use other apps on the phone while still watching the video. You can move the video around and resize it with pinch gestures.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Pop up play in action

Excellently clean audio output

The Samsung Galaxy Camera audio output came out pretty good. The device was never meant to replace your MP3 player, but it's good to know that it's capable of filling in for it when needed.
When connected to an active external amplifier the Galaxy Camera got excellent scores all over the field, with no weak points whatsoever. Volume levels were the only below average element of its performance.
Plugging in a pair of headphones introduces very little distortion, with stereo crosstalk being the only affected reading. A really solid overall performance, even if the volume levels take out some of the fun.
Check out the numbers and see for yourselves.
TestFrequency responseNoise levelDynamic rangeTHDIMD + NoiseStereo crosstalk
Samsung Galaxy Camera+0.12, -0.14-82.782.80.0120.023-80.5
Samsung Galaxy Camera (headphones attached)+0.04, -0.14-82.681.40.00830.097-60.0
Samsung Galaxy Premier+0.12, -0.05-82.982.90.0160.025-82.2
Samsung Galaxy Premier (headphones attached)+0.16, -0.07-82.582.50.2420.174-58.6
Samsung I9300 Galaxy S III+0.03, -0.05-90.390.30.0120.018-92.6
Samsung I9300 Galaxy S III (headphones attached)+0.11, -0.04-90.290.20.00920.090-53.1
Samsung Galaxy Note II N7100+0.03, -0.04-90.290.10.00980.016-90.7
Samsung Galaxy Note II N7100 (headphones attached)+0.11, -0.06-90.189.20.00670.034-55.3

Samsung Galaxy Camera frequency response
Samsung Galaxy Camera frequency response
You can learn more about the whole testing process here.

The best connected camera

The Samsung Galaxy Camera has quad-band 3G data connectivity and, in some regions, LTE. You can't do voice calls (we tried with a third party dialer), but you can send SMS messages.
If you don't want to pay for network data, you can stick to the dual-band a/b/g/n Wi-Fi. Bluetooth 4.0 and Wi-Fi Direct are supported as well.
AllShare Play comes preinstalled on the Galaxy Camera - it connects to web storage (Sugar Sync or Dropbox, there's free 5GB on Sugar) and your other devices that run the app and you can view content on the current device or push it to another (e.g. a Smart TV).
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
AllShare Play
A microHDMI port allows you to easily show off your photos and videos on an HDTV, though it's at the bottom of the Galaxy Camera, which means you'll have to rest the device on its lens barrel.
On a side note, you can use the Samsung Galaxy Camera for voice conversations as long as you use something like Skype or Viber. We tried it out with Viber and it worked (in loudspeaker mode, obviously, you can't hold the Camera up to your face). The built-in mic didn't work too well for that purpose though, but a wired hands free headset worked like a charm.

A desktop-grade Web browser

With Android Jelly Bean and a quad-core processor, not to mention a large 720p screen, the Samsung Galaxy Camera is quite good at web browsing.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Browsing GSMArena.com on the Samsung Galaxy Camera
The browser offers all the niceties you're used to on an Android phone - multiple tabs, text reflow, find on page, request desktop page and so on. You can also save pages for offline reading and adjust the screen brightness. A neat trick is to pinch zoom out beyond the minimum - that opens up the tabs view.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Tabs • Page options and settings
Incognito mode is available (the browser stops recording history and cookies) as is our favorite Labs feature, quick controls.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Quick controls
Flash isn't available out of the box, but you can install the APK manually and it will work - both 1080p YouTube videos and games worked fine.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Playing a Flash game
The Chrome browser is also available out of the box - while the stock Browser is very good (most people prefer it), Chrome can sync tabs and bookmarks with other Chrome browsers you're running on your computer, tablet or phone.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Chrome for Android

Complete organizer

The Samsung Galaxy Camera comes with Samsung's S Planner calendar. It has several different types of view: year, month, week, day along with list (agenda) and tasks lists. Adding a new event is quick and easy, and you can also set an alarm to act as a reminder.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
The organizer centerpiece - the calendar
There is also a calculator aboard. It is nicely touch optimized with big, easy to hit buttons and some advanced functions.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Calculator app
The Samsung Galaxy Camera features a decent alarm clock application which allows a huge number of alarms to be set, each with its own start and repeat time, ringtone and note.
The Clock app also comes with a stopwatch, timer and a world clock. The Desk clock mode displays the time along with weather info and a calendar.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Alarms, world clock, stopwatch, timer and desk clock

Google Maps

The Samsung Galaxy Camera comes with a built-in A-GPS receiver that is used to geo-tag photos, but also gives you access to the full Google Maps functionality.
Maps have several view modes and two-finger tilt and rotate are enabled. A long press on the map will bring up more info about that area, including a local search for anything you can think of (cafes, restaurants, ATMs, etc.). Street view is also a part of the Google Maps package.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review 
Google Maps • Street view
Vector maps are quite data-efficient and you can save even more traffic by caching areas of the map for offline use. You can't download an entire country, but you can cache all of London, for example, in just 30MB. If Navigation is available in your country, you can use that along with offline rerouting (but not offline route planning).
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Caching an area

Google Play Store

The Google Play Store is what sets the Samsung Galaxy Camera apart from other digicams. Emails, web browsers and the rest of the features are cool, but with the Play Store you can extend the functionality much further. That means new camera apps, new image editors, new ways to sync your images, you're not stuck with what the manufacturer chose to install at the factory.
The interface features several scrollable tabs - categories, featured, top paid, top free, top grossing, top new paid, top new free and trending. Apps usually have several screenshots (some even offer a demo video) so you can get an idea of what the app looks like before installing it.
You can also check out comments and ratings, as well as the number of downloads and so on, to help you decide if the app is worth it.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
The Google Play Store will give you access to hundreds of thousands of apps
The Google Play Store is full of all sorts of apps - everything from camera apps, music / video players, to file managers and various tools, you'll always see something worth a try.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100 Review
Plenty of alternative camera apps to chose from
It's not just apps though - depending on your country, the Store will also offer music, movies, magazines and books.

Final words

The Samsung Galaxy Camera is a rare breed of didgicam. This Android-powered connected camera is stuff typically shown off at tech exhibitions to wow the crowd and soon be forgotten by its maker. But the Galaxy Camera is the real deal - it's available right now.
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100
Samsung Galaxy Camera GC100
But why pay extra for the full Android deal if you're unlikely to use it all that often? And the fact that no other than Samsung has a line of Smart Cameras makes it even more complicated. With Wi-Fi connectivity they have you covered for most of the things you're likely to do with your photos - email them, post them on a social network, upload them to the cloud or apply some cool effects.
The difference between the Galaxy Camera and a Samsung Smart Camera is very much like the difference between a PC and a tablet. Tablets are cheaper but are good at some things and bad at others, while PCs tend to be pricier but are general purpose workhorses.
Here's a scenario of what you can do with the Galaxy Camera. You can broadcast video live of an event (there are several apps that do this, including Google+ Hangouts on Air), even if you can't get close (e.g. you're sitting at the back row) and get a steady shot even if you have to zoom in thanks to the Optical Image Stabilization.
Then when it's time to get up close, you can snap several photos, upload them anywhere they need to go (Picasa, Dropbox, Facebook, you name it) and write a blog post to go with them, say with a dedicated app (e.g. WordPress for Android) or a custom web-based interface you normally use on the computer or a tablet.
That's a lot like what we need to do during CES or MWC, except these events don't usually allow you to do your own video stream, but you get the idea. It's great that you get all this functionality in one package that can be adapted to your individual needs, but there are several big issues.
First, if you're doing professional work you'll want good image quality and the Samsung Galaxy Camera just doesn't cut it, certainly not when others are using micro four thirds and up. Second, the 1,650mAh battery will get drained pretty quickly, especially if you use a wireless connection, you'll have to carry one or more spares.
And third, very few people actually need all this functionality - most will just use the camera and only occasionally tap into the Android side of things. The Galaxy Camera is already dropping in price and it might reach a point where the extra cost over a regular camera is justified, but it's not there yet.
So, while the Galaxy Camera shows great promise, for now it's more prudent to use a regular camera with Eye-Fi or a USB Host adaptor hooked up to a Galaxy S III. You lose the convenience of having it all in one package, but the functionality is pretty much the same and you get to pick a camera + Android phone combo that works for you (the Galaxy S III was just an example, you can go with a Motorola MAXX phone for the amazing battery life or even a tablet, whatever works for you).
Samsung I9300 Galaxy S III Nokia 808 PureView
Samsung I9300 Galaxy S III • Nokia 808 PureView
In the end, the Samsung Galaxy Camera is let down by the quality of the photos it produces - very few (if any) people will need the advanced on-board functionality offered by Android and be okay with a camera that can't beat a cellphone camera. But we'd love to see a sequel - especially if Samsung takes its usual approach to covering the entire range. Now that they have made a point with the versatile zoom, something more compact and with a larger sensor would be most welcome.




2 comments:

Rahul SMS said...

"Here's a scenario of what you can do with the Galaxy Camera. You can broadcast video live of an event (there are several apps that do this, including Google+ Hangouts on Air), even if you can't get close (e.g. you're sitting at the back row) and get a steady shot even if you have to zoom in thanks to the Optical Image Stabilization."

In events like that the lightning generally is not that good, and the zoom makes camera shake much more pronunced, not to mention that the lens aperture get really narrow the more you zooming in, I really doubt that the optical estabilization can help too much unless the lightning is VERY good (ie: day light)...
So don't get me wrong, but I really believe that this device is a complete fail...

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